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After the death of his wife, depressed Tom Gerrin meets Leane Bossert, a year -old free spirit, and the unlikely pair hitchhike across the country. In learning to.
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What a journey for us all, and how colorful our memories will be. It was indeed a long way home! I am still in love with Three Pines. The ending was sad, but beautiful. We have come full circle through lyrical prose. View all 4 comments.

May 02, DL rated it it was ok. I'm not sure what has happened to this series.

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It's gone from being an engaging mystery series with a great deal of hidden insight to false insight being crammed in at every other line. This book made me tired. I finished it but without any pleasure. Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar and an ugly painting is ugly no matter how many hundreds of times you turn it over.

View all 10 comments. Jun 18, Kathy rated it it was amazing Shelves: A Love Letter to Louise No Spoilers I want to thank you for yet another thrilling, engaging, thoughtful, and moving book. I found your prose so graceful certainly not breathy as one reviewer labeled it-Really, tsk tsk that on many occasions I stopped to re-read paragraphs, just for the sheer beauty of the work. I was moved by the love you have for your country. It shines so brightly in this work. I only wish all readers could feel it as deeply as some of us do. Most of all, I wish I had the words to tell you how, as I have grown to know you, and know your characters, how lovingly you create their story and include us, your readers into your story-I appreciate it all.

Thank you for sharing so much of yourself with us, Louise. This story of Gamache, and Clara, and Ruth all tied together so neatly, and yet, not. You have created another brilliant storyline. And once again, given us a small glimpse into your heart as well. How brave you are. Feb 20, Dona rated it it was amazing Shelves: Hurry up August 26, ! Can't wait to read it. It's here and I'm starting it today.

Can't wait to start it, but already hate that it will have to end. I finished reading it and was not disappointed. Now I have to wait for number 11 to be written and published. I hope it's not too long of wait! View all 5 comments. The previous book in this series How the Light Gets In was such a good finale to Chief Inspector Armand Gamache's career as Quebec's Head of Homicide, ending with his retirement to the little village of Three Pines that he has come to love so much where he can start to recover his physical and mental health.

The Long Way Home ( film) - Wikipedia

I couldn't imagine that a sequel featuring Gamache in retirement could be as good and postponed reading this book for a long time and unfortunately it does not live up to the rest of the ser The previous book in this series How the Light Gets In was such a good finale to Chief Inspector Armand Gamache's career as Quebec's Head of Homicide, ending with his retirement to the little village of Three Pines that he has come to love so much where he can start to recover his physical and mental health.

I couldn't imagine that a sequel featuring Gamache in retirement could be as good and postponed reading this book for a long time and unfortunately it does not live up to the rest of the series. The picturesque, perfect village of Three Pines where everyone is friendly and clever seems too good to be true, except that we know from previous books that there have been dark currents running through the town and everyone harbours a secret or something in their past they are not proud of.

In this novel, Clara the recently celebrated artist is distressed because her husband Peter, also an artist and jealous of her success, has failed to make contact as promised after 12 months of a trial separation. She asks Gamache to help her find her missing husband, roping in his former colleague and son-in-law Jean-Guy Beauvoir and her friend Myrna and so begins a journey to trace the missing Peter Morrow's wanderings over the last year. While Louise penny's writing was as good as usual, sharp and often wry and the characters leap from the pages, the plot was slow to get going.

The cosiness of Three Pines is almost cloying and I wanted Gamache to escape that and return to what he does best, hunting down criminals. Eventually he does escape in the closing chapters of the book and the plot starts to move at a good pace as Clara and Gamache start to close in on Peter and uncover a great crime committed years ago, but it was too late to save the book as a whole. I will probably give this series another chance because it has been so brilliant up to now and read the next book, but I will be really disappointed if this series starts to turn out to be more cosy-crime than thriller.

View all 8 comments. Apr 26, Barbara rated it it was ok Shelves: In this 10th book in the series, former police detective Armand Gamache helps search for a 'lost' husband. The book can be read as a standalone. Both Clara and Peter are artists, but Peter became jealous of his wife's increasing success and imp In this 10th book in the series, former police detective Armand Gamache helps search for a 'lost' husband.

Both Clara and Peter are artists, but Peter became jealous of his wife's increasing success and impossible to live with, so Clara asked him to leave for a year. After that time Peter was supposed to return so they could re-evaluate their marriage. Peter didn't come back or communicate in any fashion so Clara asks Gamache to help her find out what, if anything, happened to her husband. It's a promising beginning that doesn't pan out.

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The story wanders much too far from a detective novel, being mostly a treatise on art and muses. Even visiting with familiar, well-liked characters was unsatisfying because they mostly just blabbed on and on about art. I like and appreciate art but I wanted to read a mystery, not an art book - and this book didn't deliver. I don't recommend it. You can follow my reviews at https: View all 3 comments. Jul 03, Barbara Hathaway rated it liked it.

I had eagerly awaited this title but found myself disappointed and underwhelmed. Penny delivered her usual beautifully descriptive prose but without the tightly woven plotting that usually makes her novels so compelling. The coincidences and artistic "insights"that advanced the plot felt forced and ludicrous at times. Without giving too much away, Peter and Clara's relationship is examined; but along the way so is the art world in depth, Gamache himself, the nine muses of Greek mythology, and the best scenery to be found in Canada. I always learn something from these books. The ending does open up the possibility for a change to come to Three Pines.

Not the best in the series, but I'm hooked. Aug 26, LJ rated it it was amazing Shelves: There he is seeking peace and recovery from recent events. Clara and her husband Peter decided to separate for one year.

The Longest Way Home

That year has now passed, but Peter has neither returned nor contacted Cla First Sentence: That year has now passed, but Peter has neither returned nor contacted Clara. The search for Peter sends Gamache, his former second-in-command, Jean-Guy, and other residents, to Montreal and into isolated regions of Quebec. From the very first, we are as intrigued by the actions of one of the characters as are other characters in the story.

We, too, want an explanation. It is particularly clear how close are Gamache and Reine-Marie, and how solid is their marriage. Yet only Penny could so effectively use a German Shepherd as a vehicle to convey loss and healing. She puts emotions into words. And then, she throw you a plot twist. This is a story that makes you want to travel; to see and experience places for yourself.

But, at the very least, you find yourself running to the internet. The characters are wonderful. They are people you want to know; what to have as friends and neighbors. You find yourself both wanting to know these people and, in some cases, wanting to be them. The dialogue is so well done, with an easy, natural flow and, occasionally, delightful humour. The book certainly has all the elements of a mystery are there, including a plot which is unusual in its structure, but it is also so much more than that that.

It is a journey that keeps drawing us down the road. If you've not read any of the books in this series, please do start at the beginning with "Still Life. She is an author whose work will stand the test of time. View all 6 comments. Long story short, I forgot to post a review about this book when I read it right after book 9.

I was too irritated to do much besides be super aggravated by the nonsense going on in the Armand Gamache series and this latest was just more of the same it seemed to me. The story was way too long and drawn out for the terrible payoff we get in the end. I was wondering about reading the next book in the series, and a friend said she thinks I will like that much better, so I will.

But, I wanted to po Long story short, I forgot to post a review about this book when I read it right after book 9. But, I wanted to post my review of book 10 before I totally forgot about it. I still don't get why he and his wife relocated there after all of the insanity that seems to befall people in this village, but they do. Gamache goes to a bench everyday and reads a book until a certain point and seems to be waiting for someone or something to come along.

Eventually, the someone does come along, Clara Marrow finally talks to Gamache about the promise that she and her estranged husband Peter made back in "A Trick of the Light" when she finally realized that for all of the lip service he was making, Peter wanted to see her do badly. The couple agrees to go their separate ways for a year, with Peter returning at the end of that year to see if they could move forward or not.

Now it's more than a year and Clara believes that something truly awful had to have befallen Peter for him not to keep his promise. Gamache's wife is concerned about him being pulled back into anything resembling an investigation that will leave him injured after the events in "How the Light Gets In. The reveal of what was going on with Peter was pretty much a letdown. Jean Guy is blissful as anything cause he finally has capture, er married Gamache's daughter.

I have already said repeatedly I don't care a bit about this romance and that still holds true here. I ended up not liking Clara much throughout this book. She was aggressive and didn't listen one bit to what Gamache was saying. And honestly if she had listened, the events that transpired at the end of the book would not have occurred. We do get to see Peter's messed up family a bit in this one, but I thought Penny did a disservice not showing them in the ending of the book. The writing was typical Penny, but honestly I was bored. I just didn't care to read the symbolism behind everything that Peter was doing.

The insights that everyone had while looking at Peter's artwork and figuring out his cold trail made me laugh. I don't know if maybe Penny had included drawings of "Peter's work" or something that would have helped us readers see what everyone else was looking at. But it's hard to read about what other characters are seeing when you don't see the artwork in question. I started skipping over stuff like that in this book just to get through this.

I would think a look back at Clara and Peter's history and the art world in general would have been way more intriguing than this, but honestly after reading "A Trick of the Light" I just cannot anymore with the art world in Canada. I had a hard time with the overall mystery that was solved here and how Peter was worked into that plot. It didn't make a lot of sense and the villain reveal in this one was done really badly. I liked what another reviewer said about this being a backwards mystery and honestly it was a backwards mystery.

I wish that Penny had just decided to not loop in two mysteries for the price of one in this book since neither one of them were carried off very well. The flow was not that great either. We have Clara, Mryna, Armand, and Jean Guy bouncing from location to location and meeting tertiary characters who I am sure will appear in future books. I just didn't care enough to pay that much attention to them. The setting of this one is a little bit of Three Pines and other locations. None of them really stayed with me at the end of this book. The ending was such a slap in the face though.

I don't know how I feel about it besides cheated. I did feel like I wasted all of my time to just get this ending that pretty much thumbed its noses at the readers. I would say that this book is pretty much filler and you can skim it to get the bare bones of the story and can skip to the next book in the series.

In this addition to the Inspector Gamache series, he and his wife Reine-Marie have retired to the little town of Three Pines, something they have dreamed about for quite some time. After Louise Penny reacquaints us with the wonderful characters and witty banter, that is always a hoot amongst the crazy inmates of Three Pines, Gamache and Reine are delighted to have a visit from their daughter Annie and his protege, Jean Beauvoir. So most of the loose ends from the last book are tied up except, Pe In this addition to the Inspector Gamache series, he and his wife Reine-Marie have retired to the little town of Three Pines, something they have dreamed about for quite some time.

So most of the loose ends from the last book are tied up except, Peter Morrow has not returned from the one year sabbatical he and Clara had decided to take in their marriage. Clara, Gamache, Beauvoir and Myrna set off on a quest to find out why Peter has not returned. For me, I think this is where the story starts to lag a bit and things become very convoluted. Gamache is determined to let Clara head up the investigation which made no sense to me or Beauvoir. This is one of my favorite series but by far not my favorite books in the saga of Three Pines.

I just finished reading, How the Light Gets In, and absolutely loved it. I was expecting more but it has not deterred me from looking forward to her next book. With the help of his formal second-in-command, Jean-Guy Beauvoir Armand started to investigate. I like Louise Penny writing style, and it was researched well by Louise. I love Louise Penny portrayal of her characters and the way they interact together. The readers of "The Long Way Home" will learn about the problems law enforcement officers have after finishing a severe case.

Also, the readers of "The Long Way Home" will see the dedication and work involved in became an artist. I recommend this book. Sep 13, Anne rated it it was ok Shelves: Some spoilers in this review, but the ending is not revealed. But I'm now wondering if a book a year isn't an awful lot to ask of a quality writer like Ms.

I listen to the audio versions of the books. In this tenth Three Pines mystery, Ralph Cosham's wonderful audio Some spoilers in this review, but the ending is not revealed. In this tenth Three Pines mystery, Ralph Cosham's wonderful audiobook narration remains pitch-perfect. Ms Penny's Gamache mysteries and Ralph Cosham's voice remain, for me, a match made in heaven. But the story itself, not so much.

It is hard to admit that "The Long Way Home" disappointed me. I wanted to be enchanted once again, but I was not. Penny introduces at least two totally unrelated story lines, compelling character development, and a variety of different people, and, gradually, expertly, pulls these strands tighter, and weaves them into a page-turner of a yarn. I think that part of the issue is the project itself. There is no murder, no beastly crime to solve, but the rather less interesting task of finding out what happened to Peter, among the least appealing of Three Pines residents.

I found it hard to suspend my disbelief that experienced police investigators one retired, one on active duty and Myrna a business woman with her own life and troubles would agree to be led by Peter's estranged wife, Clara, on a seek-and-find expedition just because he failed to keep a dinner date. For one thing, Clara is known as an untidy and somewhat bumbling artistic genius. She is not by the longest shot a leader. For another, it's a false sense of urgency. In this day and age, if you can't trace a living adult who left you using telecommunications, then, best let them be.

The single-threaded narrative was dosed out at such a slow pace that I found myself wishing Gamache and Jean-Guy would just take charge and get it done the right way, and let Clara be annoyed with them! Besides, that is at least partly why I read these books, to see Gamache at work, to watch a real leader using principles and kindness and reserving judgment, even when others are behaving in a vile, evil way. Ms Penny's books tend to feel meditative, almost like lullabies for the mind.

And this book is no exception. I love the ideas. But narrative matters, too. I understand that mysteries are a kind of piling on of details, some matter, some do not, but usually Ms Penny achieves this by drawing us into the world, not keeping us outside the story.

I recommend Penny Watson's review of this book. Nov 08, Michael rated it liked it Shelves: I stopped at exactly halfway done. I lost patience with slow plot progression despite appreciating the excellent attention of the author to nuances of emotion and motivations of her characters. Those who have come to love Inspector Gamache of the Montreal detective force may not be able to resist following him here, now retired to his beloved rural community of Three Pines. He is damaged goods, still recovering from physical and mental injuries from a treac I stopped at exactly halfway done.

He is damaged goods, still recovering from physical and mental injuries from a treacheries within his own force and a bloodbath near home. But an artist friend, Clara Morrow, asks his advice on what to do about her missing husband, now late for a planned return from a one-year sabbatical from their troubled marriage. Penny is pretty engaging in presenting Gamache through behavior and speech but not the details of logical processes.

Readers are left to make their conclusions about what Gamache is really thinking in terms of reasons behind his plans and actions. Knowing Peter as a successful painter, Gamache works with friends to try to understand how the stops on his journey may relate to people in the art world and to his development as a painter. Interesting as this is about human psychology and the fragile beauties of the artistic soul, the reader this reader is still in the dark whether Peter is in danger by the mid-point of the book. Too slow for my jaded patience.

Nice illusion for the reader in seeing these things through a non-visual medium, but I needed more of the fun or mystery intrigue to keep me on the trail to book completion. Mar 24, Leslie rated it it was amazing. Oh, I love this series; it's all I can do to not just go back to the beginning and read every book straight through. I should mention that this is the first time I've ever been ahead of the curve with a book. It will not be released until 26 August, but an Advanced Reader's Copy came my way and I snatched it up eagerly. Anyway, the plot has to do with a missing husband, the search for him, various eccentrics in a village, and art In fact, reading this book has made me think Oh, I love this series; it's all I can do to not just go back to the beginning and read every book straight through.

In fact, reading this book has made me think more about art and how it expresses emotion, whether joy or sorrow or whatever Aside from the "art" in the book, though, there are people whose company I really enjoy and look forward to joining again. Maybe from the beginning Sep 14, Grey rated it did not like it Shelves: This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Armand Gamache, former Chief Inspector of Homicide, is asked by his friend Clara to find her husband. She sent him away a year ago for a trial separation, but they agreed he'd return in a year and they'd review their marriage.

He never showed up and now she's worried that something horrible has happened. So, the next however many pages are spent going over in minute detail what it takes to find someone who's gone missing. There's a lot of jabber about art and genius, about Peter's family and arti Armand Gamache, former Chief Inspector of Homicide, is asked by his friend Clara to find her husband. There's a lot of jabber about art and genius, about Peter's family and artistic journey. Then, when they finally find the man, he gets killed saving his wife from some mad artist who's just killed another hermit artist where Peter's been living while looking for his muse.

There's no mystery to speak of. It's all philosophical filler. This was certainly not up to par with the other books in the series, not even close. This was beyond disappointing. I'm sure glad I got the book from the library and didn't spend money on it. Even so I felt cheated.

I'll never get those hours back that I spent reading it. This is not a standard whodunit. Rather this appears to be an exploration of people dealing with complex emotional issues. A story of damage and healing, envy and jealousy, "a sin-sick soul". Louise Penny 's writing style is so wonderful that you feel as though you know each character. All of their strengths as well as their weaknesses and flaws. They come alive in the story. And of course there is the sense of place. When reading any of the books in this series you feel as though you are there. Enjoying fine food in a bistro, sitting in front of a fireplace, or maybe taking a trip on the St.

He spends his mornings sitting on a bench reading from a small book, "The Balm in Gilead" "There is a balm in Gilead to make the wounded whole. He doesn't talk about his wounds His friend, and neighbor, Clara Morrow knows he is still recovering and she is hesitant at first but eventually turns to him to help her with her wounds.

She and her husband, Peter, separated. It was supposed to be a trial separation for one year. But Peter failed to come home when the year was over. She wants his help. The Peter Morrow we met in previous novels was a desperate man, desperate to recapture his fame as an artist, so desperate he would sabotage his wife's success as an artist. This was not the best book in the series and dragged in places. There was a lot of time spent discussing and examining Peter Morrow's paintings. Maybe too much in my opinion. But I once again found myself contemplating a visit to Quebec.

And I was introduced to a new place While this was not a great whodunit Louise Penny 's writing style makes for an enjoyable story. Sep 05, Ankur rated it it was ok. The premise didn't justify the painstakingly long investigation into the disappearance of Peter Morrow. I think penny must really think about the future course the series needs to take. Sep 04, Paul rated it really liked it Shelves: This is a stylish and evocative story the prose is outstanding and makes the imagery seem crystal clear. If you like a crime thriller to have a high octane plot and dead bodies filling the morgue then this book is not for you.

If you want well developed characters complete with a full back story given time in the thriller to add depth then this is the book for you. Clara Morrow has made a pact with her husband Peter a successful but fading artist to a trail separation of one year, and they would get together on that particular date whatever they felt should happen. Over a year has passed and Peter has not come home and Cara is worried. She approaches Armand and asks for his help in finding her husband.

Armand begins his search to find what has happened to Peter Morrow and where he is means that he has to find where Peter has been over the year. It follows that Peter has been to Europe and inparticular seems to have had a cosmic intervention and he has worked out who his muse is. With the trail getting cold they go back to looking at four pictures that he has painted and sent on. These pictures are the clues that are required to move them forward and will help to give them the answers that they are looking for.

This is a wonderful story which is a pleasure to read and easy to enjoy at a leisurely pace with the characters developing in every chapter. Louise Penny writes brilliantly the imagery that comes through is stunning. Sep 04, Jeanette rated it liked it. This is going to be a difficult review to write.

The prose, natural world descriptions and placements in this unique locale of haggard and isolated sea villages of the far North in Canada, like Tabaquen, were excellent. Everything else, not so much. This book is never, for more than 5 pages out of , a mystery as much as it is an analysis. An analysis both in aesthetics and in psychology, of the Peter Marrow character and the relationship he has within the work of his art painting and the con This is going to be a difficult review to write.

Moving extremely slowly within dialog between the characters from Three Pines, headed by Clara and Gamache, who seek him Peter out when he did not return after his year away, as he had promised. There were entire ten page lengths of this book that I thought akin to lectures in Art Appreciation. But was most upsetting to me was the tone of Gamache. Not just his spoken tone, but his maudlin contemplative "Balm" pamphlet or whatever it was seatings.

Plus the number of erudite asides and poetry reciting redundancies throughout this book by numerous other of our Three Pines' friends! Oh, even our Bistro owners were crying real tears while remembering and reciting, into their perfectly layered croissants and flavored, infused olive oils. Myrna or Clara or one of the guys got him to change the subject because they were all so bored. My thought right then being, oh yes, what a good idea.

My thoughts right then spoken aloud, "Hey, how about instead we talk about turning the "dog's breakfast" paintings of Peter's around again, or pin them up sideways this time, and talk about that "emotion" for 25 more pages. Sincerely, this was the most disappointing long awaited singular novel of this entire year for me, absolutely. But the most pitiful reality, is that after all that travel, snarking at each other, and various other sage amounts of wisdom from the professors in the mix and nasty Ruth- some in Latin- we get the most stark and sappy yes, both- and I know that's difficult cold fish ending in 2 pages that I think I have ever come across in writing.

Louise Penny- what possessed you to go into this direction? View all 23 comments. May 09, Kristina rated it did not like it Shelves: A Long Way Home , her tenth in the series, is my breaking point. Their carefully created idiosyncratic personalities and their occasional lapses into profanity—only shocking to a very genteel crowd—are wearing thin.

The story driving this book had me rolling my eyes non-stop. He was enjoying his peaceful life until one day Clara Morrow, the resident genius painter, came to him with a worry. They both needed space to see if their marriage could survive her rise to fame and his jealousy because of that. They agreed that one year later to the day of their separation, he would return and they would have dinner and discuss the situation. However, Peter is late by several months and Clara is worried.

Take the Long Way Home

Gamache does not want to leave behind his safe, peaceful existence to search for Peter, but he does. Penny assumes the reader is familiar with the characters and the complex relationships they have with one another. If you are familiar with her characters, then at this point you either look forward to being with them or you find their lovable and quirky complexities grating and predictable.

I am the latter. Ruth who is rude and antagonistic but really loves everyone and everyone loves her for crusty exterior which hides a heart of gold and whose duck Rosa quacks fuck fuck fuck instead of just quacking like a normal duck and everyone still finds this hilarious.

One Man's Quest for the Courage to Settle Down

Ruth, the genius poet who quotes her own poetry which is really the poetry of Canadian poet, author and literary genius Margaret Atwood and swaps lines with Gamache, who apparently knows all her poetry by heart. Everyone in Three Pines is so sensitive and intelligent and loving and philosophic. Though he ventures from the treacherous slopes of Mt. A long, strange trip on the direction of full-throttle love. Bound to be popular, this compelling and honest chronicle will not disappoint readers.

How does a loner connect? How does a traveler settle down? How do we merge into families without losing ourselves? The answer seems to be that all these things are impossible There is much to be learned, and much to be admired, in this elegant, thoughtful story. This is the story of a son, a father, a brother, a husband, a man who finds the courage not only to face himself, but to reveal himself, and, in so doing, illuminates something about what it is to be human, fully alive, and awake.

A smart, valuable book. But as an introspective and emotional journey, his story is unforgivingly honest, courageous, and hard to put down.